Wed, 16 Oct 2013 07:45:00 GMT | By IANS

Review: 'Boss'

Anthony D'Souza's 'Boss', starring Akshay Kumar, Mithun Chakraborty, Ronit Roy, Shiv Pandit, Aditi Rao Hydari and Danny Denzongpa, is a fun-filled, hugely-enjoyable masala dossier.


Boss Movie Review

The second-half of this breakneck-speed, blues-chaser of a movie opens with a long chase sequence through the narrow gallis of a dusty small-town in North India where we last saw Akshay Kumar having a ball in 'Rowdy Rathore' and 'Khiladi 786'.

Somehow in those films, Akshay ended up having more fun than we did. This time, our enjoyment-quotient matches Akshay's step-by-step, scene-by-scene, frame-by-frame and chuckle for chuckle.

'Boss' is as much fun to watch as it must have been to shoot. Almost every sequence is an 'item'. And for once the word 'item' is not a gaali.

Director Anthony D'Souza who failed so miserably in shooting an undersea adventure thriller in 'Blue', here rises out of the deep to deliver a full-blast rabble-rouser that verifies what Vidya Balan recently said about the movies - "They are all about three things....entertainment, entertainment, entertainment".

To that we can add another golden rule of honest mainstream filmmaking: kinetic energy. Every moment in 'Boss' is a celebration of cinematic conventions derived from decades of Bollywood entertainment.

Family-ties torn asunder by villainous machinations, brothers growing up with different values, and a parent who frowns at the outlawed son's ill-gotten wealth power.

Damn, Mithun Chakraborty as Akshay's disapproving father could be Nirupa Roy in 'Deewaar'. But I doubt Amitabh Bachchan's character would see the humour in the violence the way Akshay does. He stops a bone-breaking binge for a titter and then goes right back to thrashing his enemies.

Then there is the deliciously subverted morality of la-la-land. A law-maker who breaks every law of the land, and an anti-social hero who could have ended up being boringly messianic. But just as the character seems to take itself too seriously, Akshay Kumar brings him back a thumping thud, the kind that creates a crater in the ground.

Akshay, God bless his innate sense of joie de vivre underlined by a distant demeanour of unspoken tragedy that shows up in a welter of wistfulness, imparts to the old-as-the-hills heroism, a sense of freshly-found humour.

A sense of sameness had crept into Akshay's recent serio-comic outings. But in 'Boss', he bites succinctly into his juicy role, creating a kind of precarious balance into a part that blessedly careens more towards self-parody than self-glorification.

And thank God for a formidable adversary! That brilliant actor Ronit Roy as Akshay's main opponent - a khaki-clad brute named Ayushman Thakur, brings to his role a chilling propensity to turn the colour khaki into a black display of uniformed anarchy.

Ronit's introductory sequence where he ritualistically murders a cluster of criminals sets the tone for D'Souza's narration.

Shiv Pandit as Akshay's sibling displays a sincere screen presence. This newcomer's best sequence has Akshay comment, "That's the problem with you newcomers. You need to be shown how to do everything."

Well, well.

(Continued)
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