Fri, 22 Nov 2013 15:15:00 GMT | By IANS

Review: 'Singh Saab The Great'

A detailed appraisal of Anil Sharma's 'Singh Saab The Great', starring Sunny Deol, Urvashi Rautela, Amrita Rao and Prakash Raj


Singh Saab The Great Movie Review

There is something to be said about that 'dhai kilo ka haath' which Sunny Deol patented in well-made action films like 'Ghatak', 'Ghayal' and 'Gadar - Ek Prem Katha'. Lately, his career was eclipsed by wrong choices. Maybe, the 'haath' (hand) was not in the right place.

Back in form with a bang in 'Singh Saab The Great', Sunny delivers a wallop. Looking every inch the Sardar in-charge, he furnishes the film with a flair that is quite engaging. No, he doesn't wrench off a hand-pump to thrash the goon. But yes, he does turn a static jeep from back to the front with his bare hands.

And guess what? He looks every bit convincing doing the heroic hijinks in a country certainly not meant for the weak and the infirm.

When we first meet Singh Saab (The Great) in this non-stop actioner, we are told by his on-screen aides that Singh has formed a political party called Aam People's Party. Now, if that reminds you of a certain Kejriwal's Aam Aadmi Party, then I am sure the resemblance is not coincidental.

God knows, we do need a change in governance and in the rampant corruption in the country. Anil Sharma's over-zealous though never-misplaced passion to put across Sunny in a messianic mould works to a large extent. The film is an old-fashioned, very simply written morality tale between an idealistic hero and a villain who rules a backwater town with an arrogant ruthlessness that romances decadence and debauchery.

What works well for the film are the powerfully executed confrontational sequences between Sunny and the arch-villain Prakash Raj. While Sunny shows exemplary control in the inherently melodramatic milieu, Prakash Raj tries a variation on his stereotypical villainy. He comes up with a character who's a Bihari goon who can at the drop of a hat, break into a song and dance while executing the sleaziest of deeds and dialogues.

God knows, we need a bit of humour in the decadence.

It's a murky world of compromised morals out there made bearable by larger-than-life heroes who know they are up against impossible odds, and yet find a kind of subverted comfort in making their unbelievable hero-giri credible by dint of their powerful screen images.

(Continued)
MSN Mobile Entertainment

most watched right now

get connected