Thu, 06 Oct 2011 18:02:34 GMT

Review: 'Soundtrack'

There's nothing like watching a guy hit the ebb and then trying to crawl back again. The triumph of the human spirit catches our attention all the while.


Soundtrack

There's nothing like watching a guy hit the ebb and then trying to crawl back again. The triumph of the human spirit catches our attention all the while. After all, people love watching a good tragedy. 'Soundtrack', the official remake of the award winning 'It's All Gone Pete Tong', narrates one such story.

Rajeev Khandelwal is one of the few actors to have made a successful transition from television to cinema. His choice of films, starting with 'Aamir', followed by 'Shaitan' and now 'Soundtrack' prove that he's keen to be a part of movies that push the envelope, that push him beyond his boundaries. He's gradually emerged as the face of intelligent urban cinema. That's also one of the reasons why 'Soundtrack' catches your attention.

'Soundtrack' may be a 'small budget film', but we strongly believe that budgets, however big or small, can never decide on the quality of cinema. A mockumentary, 'Soundtrack' takes a closer look at a musician's life faced with a career-ending handicap. It has some heartwarming moments, some amusing moments, some comic moments and some lump in the throat moments.

Very well shot drama with touches of black humor, director Neerav Ghosh deserves immense praise for handling a complex story with amazing maturity. The story is attention-grabbing -- it traces his alcohol, drug and sex-fuelled meteoric rise, as he battles his internal demons and a damaging handicap -- and we must add that the film has a strong melodramatic theme with some terrific moments that stay with you.

'Soundtrack' narrates the story of a successful DJ, Raunak [Rajeev Khandelwal], who gets addicted to drugs and alcohol and loses his hearing ability. He goes through low phases and also starts hallucinating, seeing a joker around him all the time. He is diagnosed with a hearing disorder that ultimately leads to his going deaf. Subsequently, Gauri [Soha Ali Khan] enters his life. His career nosedives, but his love for music helps him resurrect himself.

If you think 'Soundtrack' is distressing and disheartening, let me tell you, it's not! On the contrary, it is young, colorful and most importantly, inspirational, something that goes very well what a majority of movie-going audience these days. The director also ensures that the soundtrack is befitting the content of the film. Besides, the party culture, which is prevalent in metros, where one can find sex and drugs, is depicted well in the plot.

Director Neerav Ghosh narrates an interesting story in an altogether new format. Only thing, the film tends to get stretched at places and could've done with sharper editing. Cinematography is eye-filling.

Rajeev is known for giving his best at whatever he does. Playing an emotionally unstable character is always taxing and an edgy journey for any actor, but Rajeev emerges triumphant with a bravura performance. Ditto for Soha, who delivers a sparkling performance. Soha is capable of delivering a powerful performance if given an opportunity and this film proves it. Though Mrinalini Sharma doesn't really get scope, yet, the pretty lass gives it all to her character and registers an impact. Another winning performance comes from Mohan Kapur, who is superb in a rather tough role. This film should make people sit and notice this talented actor. Yateen Karyekar does very well as well. Ankur Tewari and Sidd Coutto, the musicians, are wonderful in their respective roles.

On the whole, 'Soundtrack' captivates you with a story that talks of the triumph of the human spirit. An inspiring film, a human story, a relatable and credible journey with an atypical, feel-good conclusion, 'Soundtrack' is not to be missed.

Source: Bollywood Hungama

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