Mon, 22 Mar 2010 09:27:12 GMT

'Dildaara': Impressive!

Surprise of surprises. Here comes a neatly made film. People had least expectations from the movie before its release, but it really carries off so well that it gives a pleasant feeling to the audience.


'Dildaara': Impressive!

'Dildaara' made by a bunch of newcomers - debutant director, cameraman, composer and even fresh faces in lead roles - comes as a breath of fresh air though you feel for its wrong release date.

'Dildaara' deals with the emotional connect between the hero and his adopted father. First time director Amar has worked well in writing a competent script for the film that successfully engages the audience.

In the narrative, the main attraction is the way Amar has handled the sequences between the hero and his adopted father. For a change, character actor Rangayana Raghu has given a restrained yet likeable performance, which really touches the heartstrings.

The narrative has realistic overtones which is heartening. Even the dialogues are so natural and casual. More than the love angle between the lead artists, the director concentrates on the sentimental relationship between the father and son which is interesting.

The film starts off well and has a good first half. But it drags a bit in the second half. A competent editing work could have done wonders to the film. But still, it looks that honesty and commitment of new filmmakers have worked and mistakes are due to the inexperience in filmmaking.

The story starts off with a poor tea shop owner Ranga finding a deserted child near a railway track. He brings the child home and calls him Jaga.

Jaga grows up in rough surroundings, but he shares a strong bond with his adopted father. He makes a living out of pasting film posters and dreams of becoming a big movie star. One day he saves Jyothi, who is hounded by goons, and takes her to his house.

Slowly he starts loving Jyothi, but later finds out that she is in love with another person. Later it is revealed that Jyothi is the daughter of an underworld don and she ran away from her home. Later she is killed by the rival gang members and even Ranga gets killed.

But despite his frustrations, Jaga decides to move on to take care of his sister.

It is Rangayana Raghu who impresses most among the artists. His performance reminds us of his role in the award winning film 'Artha'.

Despite being new, both Aman and Nishma Chengappa carry off their roles with aplomb.

Technically, the film is well supported by cameraman Ravikiran and composer Praveen D. Rao. "Honge maradhi" and "Bhoomi baanalli" are catchy numbers.

Director Amar has written some earthy dialogues which go well with the narrative.

The editing work could have been a little crisper.

In short, 'Dildaara' comes as a surprise and showcases talents of some passionate youngsters. Such films need to be encouraged.

Source: IANS

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